An archive of the 50 previous news items

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The latest news from the African Leadership Institute and its Fellows.

AFLI Fellows are leaders and change-makers, so this section has a lot of news. Please use the icons below if you want to sort posts by category, such as: regular news posts, video posts, audio posts, by tag, or by blogger. Additionally, all text in all of the posts is fully searchable.

Fellow wins prestigious awards for investigative journalism

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2017 Tutu Fellow John Allan Namu has won the Media Council of Kenya's Annual Journalism Excellence Awards 2019 Journalist of the Year award as well as the Governance Reporting award in the Television category.  He has also won this year's Global Shining Light Award.  John-Allen, who is CEO of Africa Uncensored, won the awards for his investigative story titled The Profiteers. It exposes the lavish lifestyle of politicians in South Sudan and how they looted the country and stashed their wealth in Kenya and Uganda. 

In June, he also won the Trace International Prize for Profiteers in Canada, after Kenyan television refused to air the story.

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Holding leaders accountable

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2018 Tutu Fellow Alice Namuli partnered with the British Council of Uganda to collaborate on an event titled: Accountable Leadership - a tool for promoting good governance in Uganda for sustainable development.  It comprised a panel that included a Justice Kenneth Kakuru, a judge in the Appeal Court; Asan Kasingye, the Assistant Inspector General of Police; Francis Gimara, a partner in a Kampala law firm; and Perry Aritua, the Executive Director of the Women's Democracy Network.  Alice moderated the panel, which was sponsored by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission in the UK and held in Kampala on 6 December. 

She said that the discussion was on how to learn to raise personal accountability in our work, family and communities to better hold leaders accountable.

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Culture is an excuse for poor leadership in Africa

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This essay was originally written by me as part of my required coursework for the 2017 Tutu Leadership Programme.  It looks at the use of African 'culture' as an excuse for poor leadership.

He is supposed to be a leader in public office, in Africa. As soon as he was elected or nominated, he told his first wife that he was marrying an additional one and a third followed soon after that. His children were born in quick succession of each other and he boasts that he has fathered more children than the number of players who make up a soccer team. Seventeen, to be exact. On a typical day, he could easily wake up in one home, have lunch in another, and sleep at his third wife’s house. It is not necessarily true that his religion allows polygamy. He says it’s part of his “culture”.

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Gbagba, children's anti-corruption book takes to the stage

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The anti-corruption children's book, Gbagba, by 2010 Tutu Fellow Robtel Neajai Pailey has been adapted and turned into a stage play.  The play, which has an all-child cast, made its debut in September 2017 at Monrovia City Hall in Liberia. The children in the ensemble cast were trained for five months by premiere theatre company, Flomo Theatre.  Gbagba is a Bassa word which loosely translated, means 'trickery' or, 'corruption'.  In the book and its stage adaptation, children navigate the confusing ethical codes of the adults in their lives, in places as diverse as traffic jams, schools, churches and markets. The children express clearly and honestly the concrete ways in which gbagba hurts rather than heals society.

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Anti-corruption TEDx talk by Tutu Fellow

Anti-corruption TEDx talk by Tutu Fellow

Tutu Fellow Robtel Pailey has given a TEDx talk in London on her children's book to fight Gbagba (corruption) in Liberia. She reminds us all that there is nothing inherently African about corruption.  Her children’s book was published in 2013 to critical acclaim and subsequently placed on the list of supplemental readers for 3rd to 5th graders in Liberia.

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