An archive of the 50 previous news items

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The latest news from the African Leadership Institute and its Fellows.

AFLI Fellows are leaders and change-makers, so this section has a lot of news. Please use the icons below if you want to sort posts by category, such as: regular news posts, video posts, audio posts, by tag, or by blogger. Additionally, all text in all of the posts is fully searchable.

Leadership in Africa: from being, to doing, to handing over

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This essay was originally written and submitted as part of my course requirements for the 2017 Tutu Leadership programme.  It looks at three elements of leadership that are timeless and universal, but also especially relevant to Africa today if we are to see the successful transformation of our continent. The first element – servant leadership - explores what a leader must ‘be’ and the attitude and approach they should have. The second – shared vision – looks at what a leader should ‘do’ and highlights a common fundamental that is core to all great leaders, but somehow lacking in too many of our countries and companies. The final element – succession planning – looks beyond the leader, and helps us think about what comes next.

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Lessons from Hispanic Africa on African progress

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This essay, which was originally titled, The Need for a New Kind of Leadership in Africa for the Emergence of the “African Dream”: Lessons from Hispanic Africa, was originally written and submitted as part of the requirements for the 2017 Tutu Leadership Programme. It looks at how a new kind of leadership in Africa can positively impact sustainable development on the continent.  A consideration is how leaders can use myth-making to establish commonality in order to harness collective agreement on progress.
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Culture is an excuse for poor leadership in Africa

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This essay was originally written by me as part of my required coursework for the 2017 Tutu Leadership Programme.  It looks at the use of African 'culture' as an excuse for poor leadership.

He is supposed to be a leader in public office, in Africa. As soon as he was elected or nominated, he told his first wife that he was marrying an additional one and a third followed soon after that. His children were born in quick succession of each other and he boasts that he has fathered more children than the number of players who make up a soccer team. Seventeen, to be exact. On a typical day, he could easily wake up in one home, have lunch in another, and sleep at his third wife’s house. It is not necessarily true that his religion allows polygamy. He says it’s part of his “culture”.

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Those who remember our past are condemned to repeat it

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The second essay written by the 2017 Tutu Fellows we are publishing is a brilliantly written piece by Rori Tshabalala. Rori posits that in spite of a checkered and painful past, Africa still preserves its history not as a past to be learnt from but as a persistent present to be tolerated, reinforced, normalized and passed on to future generations. He suggests that rather than repeating and emotionalising the past we need to summon the courage to learn the painful history but equip the people with the skills and knowledge to capture the promise and potential of the future so they may never suffer the humiliation that their forebears suffered.

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Half-time huddle for the 2017 Tutu Fellows - a letter of thanks

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Dear Peter, Sean, Jackie and the AFLI team,

Imagine a football game where two teams meet to compete. A game is typically divided into two halves of forty-five minutes each. The teams have trained, prepared and learned as much about each other as possible before showing up on the pitch. Despite this fact, they spend the majority of the first half of the game learning about each other, making major mistakes, figuring things out and adjusting where needed. Then it's half time. The coaches take their teams to the locker room. They review the first half of the game, the players' strengths and weaknesses, and they reshape the team's initial strategy with a view to win the game in the second half. The team goes back onto the pitch with a renewed focus, a transformed view of the world, a better understanding of each individual player, and a rekindled hope for the future.

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