Hopewell Rugoho-Chin'onoHopewell Rugoho-Chin'ono


Zimbabwe, Harare

 

Occupational Information


Occupation: Television Journalist, Foreign Correspondent and Documentary Film Maker

Occupational Position: Foreign Correspondent at The New York Times

Projects


Documenting developmental projects for international organisations.

Professional History


Hopewell trained as a journalist at the Zimbabwean Institute of Mass Communications before going to City University's Journalism school in London, England. He obtained a Master of Arts degree in International Journalism and then worked with the BBC World Service as a freelance radio producer. In 2003 he returned to his native Zimbabwe to work for the BBC as a freelance correspondent. He won a British Government Chevening scholarship to go and read film at Brunel University where he obtained a Master of Arts degree in Documentary Practice in 2007. He returned to Zimbabwe in 2007 and made a multi award winning documentary film called Pain in my Heart.

Pain in my Heart won the 2008 CNN African Journalist of the year award,[2] 2008 Archbishop Desmond Tutu Leadership Award and the Kaiser Family Foundation Award for Excellence in HIV/AIDS Reporting in Africa. After making Pain in my Heart, he set up Television International in Zimbabwe, a production house which produced news for ITN and South Africa's e.tv. He has also worked with CNN International as a field producer. Hopewell is a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, the 3rd Zimbabwean journalist of only 3 Zimbabwean journalists to win the prestigious Fellowship. In 2009 he was the winner of the US Aid Communication award in Zimbabwe for his HIV and Aids Reporting.

In 2010 he was nominated for a Rory Peck television award for his documentary film A Violent Response. A Violent Response was also nominated for a 2010 BANFF World Television Award in Canada. He currently is a field television producer for UK's ITV News which is part of the Independent Television News Group. He worked as South Africa's eNCA foreign correspondent and producer in Zimbabwe from February 2008 to April 2014. He is a multi-skilled television journalist who does Correspondence, Producing, Camera and Editing work. Professional awards and Documentary films 2013 Fearless: Beatrice Mtetwa & the Rule of Law Co-Produced with Lorie Conway The documentary film looks at the life and works of Beatrice Mtetwa, Zimbabwe

Qualifications


Nieman Fellowship in Journalism from Harvard University Master of Arts degree in Documentary Film Practice from Brunel University on a Chevening Scholarship in the UK. Master of Arts degree in International Journalism from City University, London, UK. Post-grad Diploma in Mass Communications from the Zimbabwe Institute in Mass Communications majoring in Print Journalism.

Programs


2008 Archbishop Desmond Tutu Leadership Fellow

Featured News

Norman Smit
23 December 2017

Making a simple change can help realize one’s full potential. At TED Talent Search Lagos 2017 in Nigeria, Victoria Ohaeri describes the importance of changing her name to positively affect others' perceptions.  The 2016 Tutu Fellow tells her personal story about the effects of labeling, and how changing her name made all the difference.

Norman Smit
21 December 2017

Young farmers participating in a project started by 2017 Tutu Fellow Samuel Kariuki have had their first harvest and been paid for the fruits of their labour.  The new farmers in the agro-entrepreneurship Fort Hall Eye Project harvested two tons of beans. This green success is taking place in one of the most troubled counties in Kenya, where alcoholism has left almost no household unaffected.

Peter Wilson
21 December 2017

When nominations closed earlier this week, there were close to 300 really top quality nominations of emerging African leaders from across the continent for the 2018 Tutu Leadership Fellowship.  We were again impressed by the breadth of outstanding candidates who are applying for the Fellowship, reinforcing what we already know: that there is no shortage of excellent young leaders on the continent. 

Norman Smit
20 December 2017

The CEO of All On, 2015 Tutu Fellow Wiebe Boer is helping to build access to affordable sustainable energy for low income households, small business, and communities.  All On is an independent impact investing company.  As part of its approach it has also provided a grant to the acclaimed Nigerian tech incubator, Co-Creation Hub, to challenge Nigeria’s innovators on energy. Co-Creation Hub is run by 2017 Tutu Fellow 'Bosun Tijani.

A Selection of Tutu Leadership Fellows

About AFLI

AFLIICONCROPPED

 

The African Leadership Institute (AFLI) is unique among leadership initiatives in that it focuses on building the capacity and capability of visionary and strategic leadership across the continent. Developing exceptional leaders representing all spheres of society, the Institute’s flagship programme is the prestigious Archbishop Tutu Leadership Fellowship. Offering a multifaceted learning experience and run in partnership with Oxford University, it is awarded annually to 20-25 carefully chosen candidates, nominated from across Africa. Alumni of the African Leadership Institute form a dynamic network of Fellows passionately committed to the continent’s transformation, bridging the divide between nations and ensuring that Africa is set centre-stage in global affairs.

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