Hopewell Rugoho-Chin'onoHopewell Rugoho-Chin'ono


Zimbabwe, Harare

 

Occupational Information


Occupation: Television Journalist, Foreign Correspondent and Documentary Film Maker

Occupational Position: Foreign Correspondent at The New York Times

Projects


Documenting developmental projects for international organisations.

Professional History


Hopewell trained as a journalist at the Zimbabwean Institute of Mass Communications before going to City University's Journalism school in London, England. He obtained a Master of Arts degree in International Journalism and then worked with the BBC World Service as a freelance radio producer. In 2003 he returned to his native Zimbabwe to work for the BBC as a freelance correspondent. He won a British Government Chevening scholarship to go and read film at Brunel University where he obtained a Master of Arts degree in Documentary Practice in 2007. He returned to Zimbabwe in 2007 and made a multi award winning documentary film called Pain in my Heart.

Pain in my Heart won the 2008 CNN African Journalist of the year award,[2] 2008 Archbishop Desmond Tutu Leadership Award and the Kaiser Family Foundation Award for Excellence in HIV/AIDS Reporting in Africa. After making Pain in my Heart, he set up Television International in Zimbabwe, a production house which produced news for ITN and South Africa's e.tv. He has also worked with CNN International as a field producer. Hopewell is a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, the 3rd Zimbabwean journalist of only 3 Zimbabwean journalists to win the prestigious Fellowship. In 2009 he was the winner of the US Aid Communication award in Zimbabwe for his HIV and Aids Reporting.

In 2010 he was nominated for a Rory Peck television award for his documentary film A Violent Response. A Violent Response was also nominated for a 2010 BANFF World Television Award in Canada. He currently is a field television producer for UK's ITV News which is part of the Independent Television News Group. He worked as South Africa's eNCA foreign correspondent and producer in Zimbabwe from February 2008 to April 2014. He is a multi-skilled television journalist who does Correspondence, Producing, Camera and Editing work. Professional awards and Documentary films 2013 Fearless: Beatrice Mtetwa & the Rule of Law Co-Produced with Lorie Conway The documentary film looks at the life and works of Beatrice Mtetwa, Zimbabwe

Qualifications


Nieman Fellowship in Journalism from Harvard University Master of Arts degree in Documentary Film Practice from Brunel University on a Chevening Scholarship in the UK. Master of Arts degree in International Journalism from City University, London, UK. Post-grad Diploma in Mass Communications from the Zimbabwe Institute in Mass Communications majoring in Print Journalism.

Programs


2008 Archbishop Desmond Tutu Leadership Fellow

Featured News

Peter Wilson
14 March 2017

The African Leadership Institute has a strong cohort of candidates for the prestigious Tutu Leadership Fellowship.  Amongst nearly 300 nominees from over 30 African countries, 26 of Africa’s highest potential young leaders were selected to take part in the programme. Spanning various industries, representing eleven African countries and ranging from 29 to 39 years of age, the selected candidates demonstrate the wealth and breadth of leadership talent that exists in Africa’s youth.  The biographies of the 2017 candidates follows:

Norman Smit
02 March 2017

The United Nations has called attention to the wave of attacks in South Africa targeting foreigners living in the country. The attacks in South Africa have spawned calls for retaliation on South African businesses and nationals in Nigeria. The UN news site, the UN Dispatch, reports that youth groups have been the major drivers in this violence, and it goes on to quote an open letter by Ugandan youth leader and Tutu Fellow Victor Ochen. In his open letter, Ochen says that while the youth have been at the center of the attacks, they can also be part of the solution. He called on youth leaders in Africa to embrace non-violence. 

Peter Wilson
10 February 2017

There were 283 nominations of Africa’s finest young leaders from over 30 countries for the 2017 Tutu Leadership Fellowship, which starts on 22nd April. Applications closed on 15th January 2017.  Since then, a selection panel of past Fellows and AFLI Board Members have been working tirelessly to draw up a short list of candidates for final evaluation by the selection panel. The short list of 52 candidates was finalised on 7th February, and the plan is for the final selection of the 2017 Tutu Fellows to be agreed upon by the AFLI Board at the end of February. Only 17 candidates are finally selected.

Norman Smit
07 February 2017

The Bertha Centre, which is run by 2013 Tutu Fellow Dr. Francois Bonnici, has been profiled as one of the top five university-based social impact centres in the world.  The Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship is at the University of Cape Town and is part of the Graduate School of Business.  The nonprofit organisation the Bridgespan Group published the report which was done by the Skoll Foundation


A Selection of Tutu Leadership Fellows

About AFLI

AFLIICONCROPPED

 

The African Leadership Institute (AFLI) is unique among leadership initiatives in that it focuses on building the capacity and capability of visionary and strategic leadership across the continent. Developing exceptional leaders representing all spheres of society, the Institute’s flagship programme is the prestigious Archbishop Tutu Leadership Fellowship. Offering a multifaceted learning experience and run in partnership with Oxford University, it is awarded annually to 20-25 carefully chosen candidates, nominated from across Africa. Alumni of the African Leadership Institute form a dynamic network of Fellows passionately committed to the continent’s transformation, bridging the divide between nations and ensuring that Africa is set centre-stage in global affairs.

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